Nigel Bradham Committed No Crime By Possessing Marijuana

This is the look anyone should give you if you say smoking marijuana is criminal behavior

As most Buffalo Bills fans know Nigel Bradham just recently got pulled over at 2 a.m. and was charged with possession of marijuana. The charge seemed to outrage some people such as BLD’s own John Starba who felt that this situation calls for at least a team suspension, even if the league scoffs at it.

Anyone that has ever smoked marijuana knows that it does not instantly turn you into a blood thirsty criminal who must seek a rape victim. Marijuana is a natural and relaxing herb with minimal side effects compared to the prescription drugs aimed at the same results. It is also not a performance enhancing drug,  unless of course you count being ‘happy’ performance enhancing.

Nigel Bradham got pulled over for an illegal tint violation, which in my opinion is harmful to absolutely nobody. The fact that you can get pulled over for your windows being too dark is just like being pulled over for your skin being too dark. Then to be put through the legal system for taking a naturally forming medication that pacifies its user? It is complete madness.

When the police pull over peaceful citizens minding their own business, even though they have created no danger for those around them, that is wrong on so many levels. If Nigel Bradham was street racing in a heavily populated area while shooting a pistol out the window I would better understand a criminal charge.

Even if he’s a professional athlete held to higher standards, marijuana is NOT and will never be a drug that turns you into a maniac and makes you destroy everything in your path. I’m afraid that is alcohol’s job (and that is completely legal).  In a world of violent psychopaths and deranged individuals, we are detaining the peaceful and calm members of society for smoking a plant that grows as naturally as corn. In my eyes Nigel Bradham may not have been doing the right thing, but he wasnt hurting anybody and that is no crime to me. The cops that pulled him over for having the darkness are the real criminals, and until Nigel Bradham does something truly bad to those around him we should let him blaze that shit all day.  What do you guys think?

Does Nigel Bradham deserve to be disciplined for possessing marijuana?

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Topics: Arrested, Buffalo Bills, James Kriger, John Starba, Marijuana, NFL, Nigel Bradham, Pot, Training Camp

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  • knightindentedarmor

    If it were simply a case of possession of marijuana–where the cop stopped Bradham for the tinted windows and just saw the marijuana sitting there in the open–I’d be with you. But, according to the reports that I read, it’s not. According to those reports, the officer smelled pot in the car, prompting his search. That makes things very different in my book.

    Even if the officer did not charge Bradham with smoking pot–just possession–the fact that he cited smelling its odor would indicate that someone in the car (ie Bradham) had been smoking it at some point. While smoking pot before or while driving may not be quite as bad as drinking and driving, it would be very difficult for even the most ardent proponent of pot legalization to argue that it doesn’t impair normal functioning. At the very least, it slows reflexes and can, if what is smoked is strong enough or you smoke enough, impair concentration and peripheral vision. If, as has been shown, smoking a cigarette is sufficient to qualify as “distracted driving”, smoking a joint and driving–again, while not as bad as getting drunk and driving–is hazardous: not just to the driver, but to other people on the road.

    Personally, I don’t want someone driving while high any more than I want someone driving while legally drunk. And, I think that someone who is stupid and reckless enough to do so should get arrested. Do I want him to have to do time or lose his right to vote over it? No. But, I want the penalty to be strong enough to deter him from doing it again…before he or someone else ends up getting hurt in an accident because he got too “relaxed” by that last toke.

    As for your point about overly-tinted windows–which were the reason for the traffic stop in the first place: as someone who was stopped for this myself, I have mixed feelings about this. In some states, like Florida where Bradham went to college, I think they serve a purpose by cutting down the glare and making driving safer. In a cooler, less sunny clime, like WNY, I see less benefit in having them. I know why the police and government institutions want them: because it makes it easier for them to observe what drivers are doing and whether they are doing something illegal in their vehicles. But, as someone who believes strongly in privacy rights and is very protective of them, I don’t want police or even other citizens to be able to see what I am doing or where I am going at all times, either.

    In this case, for me, it also comes down to safety and I’m honestly not sure whether studies have shown that highly-tinted windows pose a safety hazard by obscuring vision in dark or cloudy weather or not. So, you may have a point in saying that they shouldn’t be banned. But, on the other hand, legislative bodies that have banned them may be right in banning them for safety reasons. If it can be/has been shown that they pose a safety hazard, then I’d have to say that the laws that banning tinting beyond a certain level has validity (even if I don’t like it) and so, too, does the law that led to Bradham being stopped in the first place.

    There are a lot of places where I think that we, as a society, have gone way overboard for the sake of “safety”. But, when it comes to driving–where tens of thousands of Americans are killed on the roads annually–I would rather err on the side of protecting drivers and their passengers. And, from that perspective, I can’t defend Bradham or say that he shouldn’t have been stopped and arrested based on the information that I have read.

  • Guest

    That is false sir you can smell pot through the bag if its high enough quality doesn’t matter what container you put it in it can still leak through. And just cause a car smells doesn’t mean some one smoked that instant. Take smoking cigarettes if you smoke in your car soon your car will start smelling like them you can open the door and get hit with an order regardless of when u smoked last it stays in the fabric just like weed smoke also for your argument about drunk drivers re the same as high drivers did you know that overly tired drivers are actually more dangerous then drunk drivers? And that high drivers are more focused on the road? Studies have shown that driving while overly tired slows our reaction time and thinking ability more so then smoking herb and we all know the dangers of drinking then driving based on other studies most dangers ways are overly tired, drunk driving, texting while driving, talking on the phone while driving, then smoking and driving. So personally I rather have a high driver than any of the above I stated. Let the record show I do not smoke weed or condone wreck less driving but I do support that people have the right in this country to make their own choices and they should have the right to smoke a naturally growing plant that has zero side affects or harm on the human body and is better for you than any pharmaceutical drug. It’s hell of a lot safer than alcohol too know one has every died by pot but have by alcohol,texting,talking on the phone, and being overly tired

  • knightindentedarmor

    First of all, while it is true that you can smell high quality pot through a bag, let me inform you that unsmoked pot sitting in a bag has an entirely different odor than the odor of pot smoke.

    Second, while it is again true that the odor of smoked pot can remain in the fabric of a car’s interior, stale smoke smells different than the odor of fresh smoke–be it cigarettes or pot.

    Third, it doesn’t matter if the pot smoke was fresh or stale: it’s presence in the car means that someone was smoking pot in the car at some point, past or present. Also, when the cop spotted the bag of pot, Bradham admitted that it was his. If you know that pot is illegal, why leave it out in the open, rather than concealing it if you haven’t used it or aren’t about to use it?

    As to your point about tired drivers being more of a hazard on the road than pot smokers: you shouldn’t drive if you’re overly tired, either. An impaired driver is an impaired driver and impaired drivers are dangerous to themselves and to other drivers and pedestrians.

    It is true that drivers who are high are more focused on the road. But, it is also true that being more focused on the road also means that their ability to notice things with their peripheral vision is lessened by that focus. Depending on how high the individual is, he/she may not be as quick to see that which is to either side of what the individual is focused on.

    Finally, as someone who has smoked pot more than a few times in the fairly distant past, who has been legally drunk, who has taken prescription codiene daily at times for pain, and whose MD has said that he would prefer to prescribe medical marijuana for me rather than the prescription medication that I am currently taking, I have a little experience with the drugs or type of drugs you mentioned. I happen to feel the same way that you do about pot being legal. It should be. But, that doesn’t mean that getting behind the wheel when you are high is a smart thing to do or that it shouldn’t be illegal to do. Just because one drug is better than another or may impair your thinking and reflexes in a different way than another doesn’t mean that you should drive under it’s influence. Impaired is impaired.

    If you want to risk your own life by driving while impaired, I don’t care. But, the problem with driving while impaired is that you are also putting other people’s lives at risk–and that I do care about. Personal freedom comes at the cost of responsibility and it is irresponsible to put other people at risk because you want to or have a right to (or should have a right to) get high. Alcohol is legal. Prescription drugs are legal. It doesn’t matter. A person should be responsible enough not to get behind the wheel of a half-ton vehicle and propel it down a road in traffic when they are impaired and put other people’s lives at risk.

    If Bradham or anyone else wants to get high at home or at a friend’s house, I don’t have the slightest problem with that at all. Just don’t do it in a vehicle or drive after you’ve gotten high until you’ve come down. If you have to travel, take a cab, walk or have someone who isn’t high drive you.

    And, just so you know that I’m not a hypocrite on the subject. I have a driver’s license. But, I don’t drive. I don’t drive because I know that the medications that I have to take can sometimes impair my reflexes. If the law changes in my state and my MD decides to prescribe medical marijuana instead of the prescription medication that I am currently taking, I still won’t drive–because I have been high enough in the past to know that my perception and reflexes would be impaired. I won’t put other people’s lives at risk when it is unnecessary by being selfish and stupid. Driving while impaired by drugs, legal or illegal, alcohol or by exhaustion is, in my opinion, being both.

  • knightindentedarmor

    First of all, while it is true that you can smell high quality pot through a bag, let me inform you that unsmoked pot sitting in a bag has an entirely different odor than the odor of pot smoke.

    Second, while it is again true that the odor of smoked pot can remain in the fabric of a car’s interior, stale smoke smells different than the odor of fresh smoke–be it cigarettes or pot.

    Third, it doesn’t matter if the pot smoke was fresh or stale: it’s presence in the car means that someone was smoking pot in the car at some point, past or present. Also, when the cop spotted the bag of pot, Bradham admitted that it was his. If you know that pot is illegal, why leave it out in the open, rather than concealing it if you haven’t used it or aren’t about to use it?

    As to your point about tired and texting drivers being more of a hazard on the road than pot smokers: you shouldn’t drive if you’re overly tired or text while driving, either. An impaired driver is an impaired driver and impaired drivers are dangerous to themselves and to other drivers and pedestrians.

    It is true that drivers who are high are more focused on the road. But, it is also true that being more focused on the road also means that their ability to notice things with their peripheral vision is lessened by that focus. Depending on how high the individual is, he/she may not be as quick to see that which is to either side of what the individual is focused on.

    Finally, as someone who has smoked pot more than a few times in the fairly distant past, who has been legally drunk, who has taken prescription codiene daily at times for pain, and whose MD has said that he would prefer to prescribe medical marijuana for me rather than the prescription medication that I am currently taking, I have a little experience with the drugs or type of drugs you mentioned. I happen to feel the same way that you do about pot being legal. It should be. But, that doesn’t mean that getting behind the wheel when you are high is a smart thing to do or that it shouldn’t be illegal to do. Just because one drug is better than another or may impair your thinking and reflexes in a different way than another doesn’t mean that you should drive under it’s influence. Impaired is impaired.

    If you want to risk your own life by driving while impaired, I don’t care. But, the problem with driving while impaired is that you are also putting other people’s lives at risk–and that I do care about. Personal freedom comes at the cost of responsibility and it is irresponsible to put other people at risk because you want to or have a right to (or should have a right to) get high. Alcohol is legal. Prescription drugs are legal. Texting is legal. It doesn’t matter. A person should be responsible enough not to get behind the wheel of a half-ton vehicle and propel it down a road in traffic when they are impaired and put other people’s lives at risk.

    If Bradham or anyone else wants to get high at home or at a friend’s house, I don’t have the slightest problem with that at all. Just don’t do it in a vehicle or drive after you’ve gotten high until you’ve come down. If you have to travel, take a cab, walk or have someone who isn’t high drive you.

    And, just so you know that I’m not a hypocrite on the subject. I have a driver’s license. But, I don’t drive. I don’t drive because I know that the medications that I have to take can sometimes impair my reflexes. If the law changes in my state and my MD decides to prescribe medical marijuana instead of the prescription medication that I am currently taking, I still won’t drive–because I have been high enough in the past to know that my perception and reflexes would be impaired. I won’t put other people’s lives at risk when it is unnecessary by being selfish and stupid. Driving while impaired by drugs, legal or illegal, alcohol or by exhaustion or texting is, in my opinion, being both.

  • islanchief

    Possession of marijuana is not a crime in NY. End of story.

  • John

    It isn’t?

  • islanchief

    No it isn’t. It is no more a crime than driving with windows that are tinted too darkly.

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